Young People’s LGBT film programming workshop

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Q1Young People’s LGBT film programming workshop

Friday 1st July 2016, Digital Performance Lab,

University of Salford, MediaCityUK, Salford, M50 2HE

10am to 6pm

 

 

Guest speakers includeQ2

Michael Blyth (BFI Flare, London)

Jay Bernard (BFI Flare, London)

Berwyn Rowlands (Iris Prize, Cardiff)

Dagmar Brunow (Teddy Award Jury 2016, Berlin and Hamburg International Queer Film Festival)

Learn different approaches to LGBT film programming, the challenges involved, how to programme for different audiences and discuss what would and would not get programmed.

Participants must be aged between 18 and 25 years old (inclusive) and are welcome to attend however they identify whether that be as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) or hetrosexual.

Participants living outside Greater Manchester must work or volunteer for a film screening organisation in order to attend. Participants living within Greater Manchester do not need to work/volunteer for a film screening organisation. They will have the opportunity to form as a group and programme some of the films for the Queer Media Festival in Manchester in November.

Participants living within Greater Manchester will be able to claim back, on production of a receipt, reasonable travel expenses from Queer Media. Participants living outside Greater Manchester MAY be able to apply for a bursary to cover the cost of travelling to the workshop from their local BFI Film Hub. Contact your local BFI Film Hub for more details.

BFI_FAN_LOGO_LOT_RGBThis project is funded by BFI Film Audience funds (supported by National Lottery), via BFI Film Hub NWC.

 

 

To apply for a free place on this workshop please use this online form:

http://goo.gl/forms/cNCp39X1ypZZHbjp2

How to get to the venue: http://www.salford.ac.uk/mediacityuk/location

Workshop organised by Jamie@queermedia.org.uk

 

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Queer Story Showcase – We Are Family

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Reel In The ClosetQueer Story Showcase will be at the LGBT Foundation on Sunday 28th February 2016 to mark LGBT History Month with a special event themed ‘We Are Family’ celebrating the family we have and the family we choose – our friends. Starting the event with six marvellous short films exploring the afternoon’s theme followed by a screening of documentary Reel In The Closet. In the feature film by Stu Maddox we discover markable footage made by LGBT people of their hidden private lives from the 1930s to the 1980s found lost in archives or rediscovered on old cinefilms found at flea markets.

The event will include a performance by poet, playwright and singer Cheryl Martin, and the director of the film Stu Maddox himself is flying in from San Francisco to answer your questions and maybe help you discover that lost film footage in your closet.

People are invited to join this exciting film afternoon featuring many queer stories, have conversations, relax and during the networking break make connections with filmmakers. February’s theme is ‘We Are Family’ inspired by the 1979 hit disco classic from Sister Sledge as we celebrate the fact that a family can come in many forms.

This Queer Film Network tour is supported by the BFI Film Audience Network via Film Hubs in Wales, South West & West Midlands, North West Central and London.

Doors open at 12.45pm and the event starts at 1pm.

Get tickets: https://queerfamily.eventbrite.co.uk

REVIEW – Queer Story Showcase – ‘I Love the Nightlife’

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When you are invited to film screenings, it can be with dread as the standard is varying to say the least, however I went to the I Love The Nightlife, Queer Story Showcase at the Digital Performance Lab in Salford and was hugely rewarded. The standard of the films on show was exceptionally high.

The brainchild of Queer Media Festival organiser, Jamie Starboisky, the evening showcased eight short films then broke for networking before showing the wonderful Dressed As A Girl feature.

The eight shorts were a mix of international and home grown talent kicking off with gentle drama, Alaska is a Drag, a gay love story in the unlikely setting of an Alaskan cannery, the hilarious Cruising Electric also deserves a mention, look it up on Youtube, as well as the delightfully bonkers MeTube, a trip into the imagination of a repressed soul.

Documentary film Black Lesbian Handbook

Documentary film Black Lesbian Handbook

Documentaries were well served as well with Black Lesbian Handbook delving into lesbian culture and En Vogue proving that 25 years after Madonna brought it to the masses, vogueing is still alive and well.

 

Elena Browne and Neil Ely in-conversation with Adam Lowe

Elena Browne and Neil Ely in-conversation with Adam Lowe

But it was the Manchester double bill that was truly inspiring. The first piece was Painted by Salford University graduate, Elena Browne. I caught up with Elena before the showing to talk about her delve into Manchester’s drag world.

“Painted is a dragumentary which came from always going down Canal Street” she explains “My friends had an obsession with RuPaul and we binged watched Drag Race so it was natural for it to be my dissertation. The film looks at different types of drag, traditional (Misty Chance), new wave (Cheddar Gorgeous and Anna Phylactic) who have honed their art, and alternative (Danny Beard) who has created a whole online persona.”

The film is beautifully edited and really delves into the personalities of these stalwarts of Manchester’s gay scene. “It took about four weeks of filming and a lot of late nights” she laughs “We had an interesting night at Cruz 101, the Gag Ball which was a leather and fetish night”.

Browne now has an internship at Blakeway North but is definitely a name to look out for in the future.

The second Manchester piece was Mirrors by Neil Ely. This is a subtle piece set in a nightclub toilet focussing on two straight lads who find themselves, for whatever reason, in a gay club. Featuring Shameless star Jody Latham and Skins star Liam Boyle, the tempo and style of this simple film is fantastic.

Ely explained in the subsequent question and answer session “I’d written two scripts before but wanted to take it back to when I was coming out, maybe there is a grey area to sexuality”.

Following the break, it was the turn of London producer, Chris Amos to present Dressed As A Girl, a fascinating and fabulous look at alternative drag artists in London who pioneered the infamous Gay Bingo nights.

Q&A with drag artist Cheddar Gorgeous, writer Dave Haslam, film producer Chris Amos and host Adam Lowe.

Q&A with drag artist Cheddar Gorgeous, writer Dave Haslam, film producer Chris Amos and host Adam Lowe.

Set over a period of ten years, the film by Colin Rothbart delves deeply into the psyche of this group of friends who made an indelible mark on the London scene. We join them at their hedonistic height and follow their stories as they all go their separate ways.

The film is searingly honest in examining what drives our heroes dealing with issues such as living with HIV, substance abuse, damaged upbringings and mental illness, making the viewer fall in love with each person in their own way culminating in a wonderful finale as they regroup for one last bingo night.

I would recommend seeing this film and many of the others, the first opportunity you get and I would definitely keep an eye out for more Queer Media events, watching great quality films in friendly surroundings, what more could you need?

by Chris Park for Canal-St Online

More info on Dressed As A Girl and the other films screening as part of Peccadillo Pictures POUT Tour click here.

Queer Story Showcase – Political Pride

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Celebrate Manchester Pride at our screening of four international LGBT short films themed around Political Pride screening on Saturday 29th August at 3.45pm. The films include a documentary about eleven year old Melvin who lives in the Netherlands and has come out to his parents; a dramatisation of a gay couple living in the Middle East facing execution; story of a black gay kid coming out on the eve of Obama’s election; and two friends in India drawing parallels between Gandhi’s work attending marches and a gay pride march. Entry is free so join us at our Queer Story Showcase at Manchester Metropolitan University Business School by All Saints Park at 3.45pm. Follow us on Twitter @QueerStoryUK and click on this link to join the event page on Facebook.

Our film screening is part of Political Pride, organised by the Joyce Layland LGBT Centre, LGBT Youth North West, Manchester Metropolitan University and People’s History Museum who have joined forces to programme a weekend of alternative events to take Pride back to its roots.

Political PridePolitical Pride, which takes place on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th August, immediately following the Manchester Pride parade, will include workshops, film screenings, discussions and performances, alongside a series of family-friendly activities. All events will be cost-free and inclusive, and will take place in several accessible locations on and around the Oxford Road Corridor in Manchester.

The weekend will provide a platform for participants to explore the politics of Pride, and to identify and explore some of the most important issues for the LGBT+ community today. Political Pride will provide an accessible and alternative space to the pub and club scene of Canal Street, in order to open up the Pride celebrations to a more diverse representation of LGBT+ people in the North-West.

All activities are free and below is the list of films that will be screened at Queer Story Showcase. Check out the Political Pride website for information on the other activities.

DIRECTIONS: Queer Story Showcase will take place in Lecture Theatre 1, on the ground floor of the Business School (number 4 on this map). The building is fully accessible, and we’ll make sure that the way to the lecture theatre is fully signposted.

JamieCHANGE
Dir: Melissa Osborne, Jeff McCutcheon, USA, 2011, 23 min
A gay African-American teenager grapples with his young identity on the night Obama was elected president, and Proposition 8 – the voter initiative to eliminate same-sex marriage in California – passed.

 

 

BECAUSE…Because (Kyunki)
Dir: Avinash Matta, India, 2014, 10 mins
Hindi with English subtitles

When you start believing, you don’t have to be answerable. ‘Kyunki’ is a short journey of a non-believer towards his realisation of faith in queer rights.

 

ABAN + KHORSHID
Dir: Darwin Serink, USA, 2014, 15 min
Persian, English subtitles
In 2005, the world saw a photo of two young Iranian men being executed for being gay. That image inspired this film about the two men in the hours before their execution.

If you only had a few hours to live, what would you share with the one you love?

 

Straight With You Daan Bol - Niet Op Meisjes - Still2 Straight With You
Dir: Daan Bol, Producer: Randy Vermeulen, Netherlands, 2013, 19 min

Straight With You is a documentary about eleven-year-old Melvin, who has a secret: he is not into girls. Although his family knows, he’s afraid to tell his schoolmates, as he thinks they might start bullying him. What should he do when the coolest girl in his class sends him a love letter?

Please share, tweet, post and invite your friends to what will be an inspiring and incredible journey through film showcasing queer stories and click on this link to join the event page on Facebook..

@QueerStoryUK

Fusion: Celebrated BAME LGBT stories as part of Black History Month

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Fusion celebrated the stories of the LGBT Black, Asian and ethnic minority community with conversations with LGBT media professionals, interspersed with LGBT themed short films. Held on 19th October 2014 the event was hosted Queer Media and supported by UK Black Pride. The aim was to inspire positive BAME LGBT stories, role models and promote their visibility in the media as part of Black History Month.

FILMS : CONVERSATIONS : PERFORMANCES

Fusion asked can storytelling really empower people to create positive social change within their community?

About the team

The four hosts for Fusion were (clockwise from top left) Fusion hostsPink News political editor Scott Roberts, freelance sports journalist Jessica Creighton, Aashi Gahlot editor-in-chief and founder of website shorlgbtq.com, and poet, playwright and director Cheryl Martin.

The event was a chat show sofa style format inspired by TED talks, where the hosts introduced short films and interviewed the guests, who have diverse media backgrounds such as; film, TV, radio, news, arts, performance about their career and their intersectionality. Fusion followed the success earlier in 2014 of the Queer Media Festival held on 7th February 2014, on the day the Sochi Games opened at MediaCityUK.

Fusion guests included: Asif Quraishi (UK’s first Muslim drag queen), Eiynah (author of My Chacha is Gay) via Skype, Rudy Katochi (Multimedia journalist for Press Association), Bobby Tiwana (live event producer), Mike Buonaiuto (filmmaker), Aziz Rachid (Head of BBC North West), Phyll Opoku-Gyimah (Director & Co-Founder of UK Black Pride), Mobeen Azbar (journalist and film maker) and Rebecca Swarray (performer, singer and actor).

One thing I have learnt is that we all struggle- we all fail- we all succeed- these things are not as important as having the courage to stand up and try (again!). As long as we keep on trying, nothing is impossible. I feel that people are encouraged to give up more than they are to keep trying 🙂 We are all AMAZING!! – Aashi Gahlot, ShorLGBTQ.com

Fusion: One story at a time we are all changing the world and here are all five in-conversations for you to watch:

UK Black Pride co-founder Lady Phyll and Bobby Tiwana in-conversation with Cheryl and Aashi

UK Black Pride co-founder Lady Phyll and Head of BBC North West Aziz Rashid in-conversation with Cheryl and Aashi

Film director Mike Buonaiuto and Rudy Katoch a multimedia journalist in-conversation with Cheryl and Aashi

Children’s book author My Chacha Is Gay and women’s rights campaigner Eiynah via Skype, alongside journalist and film maker Mobeen Azhar and the UK’s first Muslim drag queen Asif Quraishi in-conversation with Jessica Creighton and Scott Roberts.

Rebecca Swarray, performer, actor and singer, with a background teaching performing arts in-conversation with Jessica Creighton and Scott Roberts.

InterMedia at ITV Studios

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We arrived at the ITV Headquarters on London’s Southbank after being whisked down on a scenic journey from Manchester by Virgin trains, and met up with rest of our friends from February’s festival and after networking for a while took our seats in the audience, as the sun set over the Thames, for an important discussion with InterMedia‘s members about some of the lastest anti-bullying campaigns.

ITV Creative and Stonewall have been working together to tackle homophobic bullying with their School Sponsorship Anti-bullying project, and Stephen Barber and Grivas Kopti talked about work they had done creating a poster to highlight people’s perceptions of LGBT issues and discussing homophobic phrases. ITV has also produced a video featuring employees such as Sonia, who works on This Morning, to encourage people to speak up for support whilst they’re at school. Working in partnership like this they produced Vines and Instagam videos that really had the ability to reach the younger generation with an important message.

Following on from the encouraging words from ITV we heard in a video message from Shaun Dellenty who founded Inclusion For All, a new initiative the deputy head primary school teacher had devised to train teachers on how to communicate the impact of the negative use of the word gay in schools. ITV isn’t alone in the work it is doing with schools and Hannah Kibirige from Stonewall talked about their campaign No Bystanders to impress on people that words leant at school carry on into adult life. Stop it at the start and don’t be a bystander is their powerful message.

Hailing from Manchester and also having done the LGBT Heritage Walk of the rainbow tiles in the city centre we knew the tragic tale of Albert Kennedy and the trust formed after his death. AKT formed in 1989 after Kennedy, a gay man, fell to his death from a city centre car park after being pursed by a homophobic gang, and aim to provide a range of services to meet the individual needs of those who would otherwise be homeless or living in a hostile environment.

When Stephanie Fuller from AKT stood to talk about the charity, even though she felt apologetic she may bring the room’s positive mood down, we knew what she had to say was important as many in the room being based in London may not of heard of the charity. There is still work with LGBT teens that is still vital and ongoing and even Stephanie said, when she recently started in the job that she was surprised at the level of need for support that still continues today. She told us how one recent outing by a school teacher resulted in a young boy being stabbed, and then kicked out of home.

These days pupils can be easily outed through social media and the lack of representation of LGBT people in the media means there are no positive role models for this younger generation. Visibility is very important which is something we aim to continue to support through our next Queer Media Festival events with queer film screenings and conversations with LGBT media professionals. Things will change even if it is not as fast was we would like but together we are heading in the right direction.

Many thanks to InterMedia and ITV for a fantastic worthwhile event.

To London for the BFI Flare Festival

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We have always had a massive interest in LGBT films and have been for many years avid fans of the BFI Southbank’s wonderful London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival now renamed BFI Flare but not only was the name different but we were lucky enough to be attending this year as delegates. There aren’t so many LGBT films screened in Manchester so our trip down meant we were lucky enough to get to see several films in what is always a sold out event.

This was a great opportunity for us to watch new and archive films and attend the industry seminars to learn from established festival programmers on how they find content, decide what to schedule and how they make choices through the plethora of shorts we could view in the viewing gallery.

We were very keen to see the short films and discover what had been submitted and this year the films had been placed into sub strands of Hearts, Minds or Bodies and it was anyone’s guess which one was going to light our senses the most.

The first set of shorts we saw were the Hearts as there was three sets of compilations in that section that explored close encounters, the heart’s desire and the tangle of relationships and as we watched the passion in the stories we were drawn in to these fantastic films.

After hours of watching all of the shorts submitted to BFI Flare we noted down those that had us captured, taken and had told a story to us which is important for a festival inspired by the TEDx talk by Chocolat writer Joanne Harris, where she described the power of stories and how they have the power to effect incredible changes. Watching all those films wasn’t a chore it truly felt a privilege as we got to travel the world and into different people’s lives and see things they saw and feel how they felt and it was an incredible journey of love, pain, frustration, or new hope and all other emotions too many to detail all in the snap shot that is a short film.

The best compilation of shorts we watched was the You’re The One, Aren’t You? that combined shorts featuring the couple next door that wants to try swinging to the lonely astronaut longing for love, these were funny and tender films that all proved that relationships are never easy.

Photo credit: QueerMediaUK