Queer Media Festival 2017 – Full speaker schedule – Sat 18th Nov – HOME, Manchester

BAME, bisexual, gay, lesbian, LGBTQ, Manchester, media, queer, transgender

After last year’s sell-out event, Queer Media Festival returns for the festival’s fourth year, to commemorate fifty years since homosexuality was partially decriminalised, by celebrating the amazing range of LGBTQ stories in all forms of media. During the day hear from inspiring guest speakers who are creating LGBTQ stories using the new digital platforms of virtual reality, gaming or mobile filmmaking. Meet storytellers in legacy media like theatre making, performance, playwriting, and poetry. Enjoy a creative mix of engaging talks, performances, and workshops aiming to refresh the way that LGBTQ voices are heard.

Explore the queer rainbow of diverse stories and discover how to tell your story!

Queer Media Festival is a one day event on Saturday 18th November at HOME, Manchester’s £25 million combined arts centre with tickets starting from £10. Click here to buy tickets.

We are proud to announce our full schedule of guest speakers for 2017:

John McGrath, our keynote speaker, is the Artistic Director of Manchester International Festival.  Appointed to the role in 2015, John was previously Artistic Director of National Theatre Wales which he launched in 2009 achieving an international reputation for large-scale site-specific work, digital innovation, international collaboration and extraordinary community involvement. John has worked as a theatre director in New York, London and was Artistic Director of Contact Theatre in Manchester from 1999 to 2008. Awards include the National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts (NESTA) Cultural Leadership Award (2005) and an Honorary Doctorate from the Open University (2015).

Erinma Ochu is Creative Director of Squirrel Nation, which she co-founded and runs with Designer and partner, Caroline Ward. They design immersive concepts, often blurring fact and fiction to speculate on how we might live in the future: from a pop up urban farm, farmlab, to The Purring Chamber, which encourages folk to explore our relationship with cats and other species we’ve loved, lived with and lost. Recently Erinma was a Jerwood Fellow with Manchester International Festival, attached to Yael Bartana’s What If Women Ruled the World.

Her foray into queer mediamaking began with an interest in amateur photography, saving up £1 a week to buy a £13 camera only to accidentally take pictures of her left ear. Expelled from sixth form, Erinma has been breaking rules and pushing boundaries ever since. Originally she trained as a neuroscientist before turning to broadcast and digital media as development executive for London based creative agency, B3 Media. Erinma is a Lecturer in Science Communication and Future Media at Salford University. She is indy curator for Sheffield Doc/Fest and volunteers for The Proud Trust.

Deirdre Mulcahy

After a successful career as a BBC Camerawoman, Deirdre has spent the last 11 years training BBC journalists. She has trained on a variety of cameras and edit systems and has recently developed a training programme to deliver these craft skills using a mobile phone. Her workshop will enable Queer Media Festival delegates to shoot professional looking interviews with quality sound and give the foundations of how to build up your story visually

 

James Kavanagh

Dublin native, James Kavanagh, is Ireland’s Snapchat King. Not only is James a social media aficionado, he also runs Currabinny, a food brand and catering service, with his partner William. James uses his social media platforms to spread awareness on LGBTQ issues and erase the stigma surrounding it from society in his distinctive witty style.

 

 

Lucy Dusgate produces and leads the digital art programme for The Lowry and the outdoor Quays Culture public realm art programme at Salford Quays. This includes new commissions and presentations across the galleries, theatres and public spaces in the building and outdoors. Local, national and international artists are invited to perform, exhibit and respond within the spaces of The Lowry. Artists have always used technology in their practice, and we see the inclusion of digital as an acknowledgement of some of the best quality art being integrated into the artistic vision at The Lowry.

Ella Otomewo is a queer performance poet from Birmingham, living in the North West. Most recently, Ella was part of a small team of poets who wrote and performed in Young Identity’s sold out performances of Hatch at Contact Theatre. Ella was also a member of the Manchester International Festival’s Creative50 team, and was commissioned to create poetry in response to pieces at the festival. She facilitates creative writing workshops and has performed at numerous spoken word events up and down the country. Ella’s work is feminist, personal, and candid.

Click here to buy tickets.

Adam Zane, Artistic Director of Hope Theatre Company

For the past two years Adam was dramaturg and director of Gypsy Queen, working with writer/performer Rob Ward on his new play. Gypsy Queen has since toured to Leeds, Sheffield, Doncaster, Liverpool, Brighton Fringe, Dublin International Gay Theatre Festival, Kings Head Theatre, London, Hope Mill Theatre, Manchester and received 5 Star reviews at the Edinburgh Fringe. Adam’s new play Jock Night premiered as a short play (the first of a trilogy of Jock Nights). The play deals with a number of LGBT+ issues including PrEP, chem-sex and the search for love and friendship in a world of sex and drugs. Jock Nights Part 2 and 3 will be performed as ‘a theatrical soap opera’ before touring as a full-length play in 2018.

Tim Brunsden is a film and video maker creating films with a focus on community and outsider culture.  He is an Associate Artist with Duckie and lead on digital output for Homotopia Festival in Liverpool.  He is also Co-Director of Re-Dock, working alongside artists and film-makers Sam Meech, Hwa Young Jung and Neil Winterburn.  Re-Dock is a Community Interest Company that combines our interest in digital media, participatory mapping and storytelling in research-led arts practice that engages with communities.

 

Richard Franke is founder and director of Magic Notion, developers of ‘Kitty Powers’ Matchmaker’ the YouTube sensation arcade dating simulator. Richard worked in the games industry for over 20 years on award winning titles such as The Burnout franchise, Need for Speed Hot Pursuit, and Tearaway before creating independent studio Magic Notion. He stars as his drag alter-ego Kitty Powers in Magic Notion’s first title, as well as its upcoming follow up ‘Kitty Powers’ Love Life’ as well as doing live appearances at events around the world. Kitty Powers spreads a message of love, acceptance, diversity and gender fluidity.

The Nightbus is a drag terrorist; Europe’s Premier Bearded Muslim Drag Queen with a busload (geddit lol!) to say on oppression, hatred and marginalisation that will shake your core beliefs. After touring Europe and the US, a successful run in Edinburgh and Arts Council commissions for Manchester International Festival, this vehicular beacon of awfulness knows no limits. More sensitive passengers are requested to take several seats, strap the fuck in and enjoy the ride.

 

Jacob Engelberg is a Film Programmer based in Brighton, England where he runs the queer film strand Eyes Wide Open Cinema. Jacob has an academic background in Film Studies and Queer Theory; his masters degree in Sexual Dissidence looked at the representation of bisexuality in the films of Gregg Araki. Taking a ride with Jacob through his talk on cinema’s invocations of bisexuality, from well-known Hollywood neo-noir thrillers to underground queer filmmaking to the extremities of European art cinema, let’s take a moment to consider representations of bisexual desire on screen.

Kate O’Donnell is a transgender performer, activist, theatre and cabaret maker. She is the Artistic Director of Trans Creative a newly formed trans theatre company who aim to be trans led and trans positive.  Kate’s work is autobiographical, entertaining and political showing pride and strength in being transgender and includes; the award-winning Big Girl’s Blouse and several well received cabaret performances; Hayley and Me, A Short History of My Tits and No Pride. Kate is currently touring her critically acclaimed one woman show You’ve Changed following its preview at the Edinburgh festival. This year Trans Creative initiated and curated Manchester’s first trans arts festival and was part of the Manchester lnternational Festival opening event ‘What is The City but the People?’. Currently working on a project to trans up Manchester, working to make the city, its buildings and its people more trans friendly.

Queer Media Festival – Saturday 18th November 2017
HOME, Manchester – 11am to 5.30pm
The festival will have gender neutral toilets and be BSL interpreted
BOOK NOW: Click here to buy tickets!

 

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Queering Animation – HOME – Saturday 18th November – 8.30pm

animation

Celebrating the medium of animation in telling queer narratives is Queering Animation, our evening screening to close the Queer Media Festival 2017. Expect an amazing array of twelve LGBTQ animated short films created from live action, hand drawn illustrations, computer generated to stop motion techniques exploring the queer colourful cartoon rainbow of diverse stories. Saturday 18th November at 8.30pm at HOME, 2 Tony Wilson Place, Manchester M15 4FN. Click here to book tickets!

Bearable (U)

It’s not easy living with a bear.
2D animated short film by Studio Meraki.

Queer Heroes (12A)

A celebration of queer figures in both historical and contemporary times who have helped push forward arts, politics or science.
A collaboration between 14 animators, the structure is based on the old Surrealist drawing game Exquisite Corpses.
Each animator was given a hero to animate, passing on their last frame to the next animator to form their first frame and so on.

B. (12A)

B. tells a story about self-determination. It’s the story of Barbie, who fulfils social expectations and therefore leads an imposed existence in which she is unsatisfied.
Barbie falls in love with a mysterious, red haired woman but she is too insecure to react to her feelings. Instead she does what people expect her to do: She goes with Ken and an unkind, but socially accepted, relationship. Doing the one thing she is good at, Barbie suppresses her own desires, as it has been expected by women for all her life. But she is haunted by the thought of what could have been and keeps losing control of her emotions. Realising that she wasted her only chance to live a happy and fulfilled life Barbie tries to find someone to blame. And succeeds.

Tailor (12A)

TAILOR is a transgender cartoonist that shares in his web page other trans people’s experiences and their challenges in society.

The Sad Mime Knight (U)

A Knight who also happens to be a Mime. He’s pretty down on his luck when it comes to cash. Will he be able to buy himself a meal deal later tonight when the hunger sets in?
Meanwhile somewhere nearby, a Snowtrooper from Star Wars is being chased in a light blue Ford Anglia by the meanest boss in the world flying a TIE fighter.

A comedy/thriller/romance brickfilm by Leeds College of Art graduate Sylvia Winnington

Half a Life (15)

After a traumatic encounter, a young, gay Egyptian joins the LGBT rights movement. When his safety is jeopardized, he must choose whether to stay in the country he loves or seek asylum elsewhere as a refugee. HALF A LIFE is a timely story of activism and hope, set in the increasingly dangerous, oppressive, and unstable social climate of Egypt today.

Click here to book tickets!

Boys in the Street (U)

Animation to Greg Holden’s Boys In The Street.

Open Recess (12A)

An animated documentary about a nostalgic story of the childhood romance of two girls.

Chromosome Sweetheart (U)

An ex-couple in a café, a girl sucking on her girlfriend’s hair, a running woman, a fleeing town, a little girl walking along the river. In this world, there are as many forms of love as there are people.

The Night Cleaner (15)

As the night cleaner in Canada’s busiest gay bathhouse, Travis has grown accustomed to the unusual duties that befall an employee in such a testosterone charged environment. With good humour and a touch of shyness, Travis takes the audience on an amusing, and sometimes harrowing tour through his nightly duties. His twilight tour shines a light on the inner workings of bathhouse culture, and addresses ideas of disposable sex, gay male bonding, and heterosexual interpretations of gay male spaces.

Pussy (12A)

A young girl spends the evening alone at home. She decides to have some sweet solo pleasure session, but not everything goes according to plan.

Black enuf* (12A)

A queer oddball seeks approval from black peers despite a serious lack of hip-hop credentials and a family that ‘talks white’. My quest for a Black Card (undeniable acceptance of my racial identity) takes me from Missouri, to New York, and halfway around the world. My animated documentary, black enuf*, examines the expanding black identity through a personal journey. The film interweaves stories from my great- grandmother’s autobiography, interviews of family & friends, and my hand-drawn memories. Tongue-and-cheek humor makes such a heavy topic easier to digest. The visuals mix Monty Python style cut outs, infographics, watercolor, and a variety of illustrative styles. We’re all on a quest for acceptance.

Click here to book tickets!

#TransMCR Film Festival

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In the cold and dark month of January come along, pull up a comfy sofa and enjoy a full programme of diverse short and feature length films showing a range of trans and non-binary themes and experiences at #TransMCR Film Festival on Saturday 14th January. The programme of short films curated by us will be confirmed soon but we are excited to say the feature length film will be 2016 documentary Real Boy (check out the trailer below).

As always at #TransMCR there will be refreshments, workshops, legal and healthcare advice surgeries, community cafe space and a range of beauty and holistic therapies. Find out more about the other activities happening that day by clicking here.

#TransMCRSave the date, click on the event page that you are coming, share with friends and we look forward to seeing you all soon.

Queer Media Festival 2016

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Thank You to everyone who made Queer Media Festival 2016 at Manchester’s combined arts centre HOME so amazing.

It was truly a wonderful day and reading the comments on the feedback forms people have left the festival feeling it has been fun, eye-opening, thought provoking, amazing, enlightening, friendly, inclusive, interesting, informative, engaging, inspiring, life changing and life affirming to be amongst like minded queers.   

Fantastic job from everyone involved and a big thank you to everyone who came along for making our event such a special success! Favourite quote: “It was much more in-depth and inspirational than I thought it could be”. So we look forward to seeing you all at next year’s festival!!!

“Be proud…whatever it is be proud, because everyone is someone!” Jose Xtravaganza

#QueerMedia16

 

Young People’s LGBT film programming workshop

asian, BAME, bisexual, black, gay, homosexual, lesbian, LGBT, media, queer, transgender

Q1Young People’s LGBT film programming workshop

Friday 1st July 2016, Digital Performance Lab,

University of Salford, MediaCityUK, Salford, M50 2HE

10am to 6pm

 

 

Guest speakers includeQ2

Michael Blyth (BFI Flare, London)

Jay Bernard (BFI Flare, London)

Berwyn Rowlands (Iris Prize, Cardiff)

Dagmar Brunow (Teddy Award Jury 2016, Berlin and Hamburg International Queer Film Festival)

Learn different approaches to LGBT film programming, the challenges involved, how to programme for different audiences and discuss what would and would not get programmed.

Participants must be aged between 18 and 25 years old (inclusive) and are welcome to attend however they identify whether that be as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) or hetrosexual.

Participants living outside Greater Manchester must work or volunteer for a film screening organisation in order to attend. Participants living within Greater Manchester do not need to work/volunteer for a film screening organisation. They will have the opportunity to form as a group and programme some of the films for the Queer Media Festival in Manchester in November.

Participants living within Greater Manchester will be able to claim back, on production of a receipt, reasonable travel expenses from Queer Media. Participants living outside Greater Manchester MAY be able to apply for a bursary to cover the cost of travelling to the workshop from their local BFI Film Hub. Contact your local BFI Film Hub for more details.

BFI_FAN_LOGO_LOT_RGBThis project is funded by BFI Film Audience funds (supported by National Lottery), via BFI Film Hub NWC.

 

 

To apply for a free place on this workshop please use this online form:

http://goo.gl/forms/cNCp39X1ypZZHbjp2

How to get to the venue: http://www.salford.ac.uk/mediacityuk/location

Workshop organised by Jamie@queermedia.org.uk

 

REVIEW – Queer Story Showcase – ‘Let’s Talk About Sex’

BAME, bisexual, black, gay, homosexual, lesbian, LGBT, media, queer, Uncategorized

DSC_0068Manchester Metropolitan University’s Humanities in Public Festival continued its frank discussion about sex last week with an event that explored the worlds of ‘chemsex’ and ‘slamming’ parties. The event, hosted and organised by Queer Media Festival director Jamie Starboisky, was entitled ‘Queer Story Showcase: Let’s talk about sex’.

The evening began with a series of short films that address such issues as male prostitution, sex and disability and, in Wham, Bam, Mr Pam, the challenges of being a successful female film maker in the male dominated world of gay pornography.

Adam Lowe premiered his latest writing 'Slam Poem'

Adam Lowe performed his latest writing ‘Slam Poem’

The audience were then treated to a reading by Manchester poet Adam Lowe before being given access to the world of so-called slamming parties with a screening of William Fairman and Max Gogarty’s feature-length documentary Chemsex. Chemically fueled sex parties, which sometimes last for days, are a trend with which a number of gay men are becoming involved, particularly in London and other major cities. With new cases of HIV on the rise, these parties, many of which are organised online through apps such as Grindr, are a potential cause for alarm amongst sexual health professionals.

The film in unflinching in its depiction of these issues, as it follows slamming party enthusiasts, such as Andrew, Miguel, Enrique and Simon, through a series of drug-fuelled encounters, psychotic episodes and comedowns. To these men, sex and drug-taking have become synonymous and particularly troubling are their stories of deliberately becoming infected with the HIV virus. Once they become ‘pos’, the men no longer have to worry about the risk and are thus able to have sex with men who are already HIV positive. As Andrew says of HIV, “It comes with the territory.”

David Stuart from 56 Dean Street

Q&A with David Stuart from 56 Dean Street

In the film, David Stuart, Substance lead at London sexual health clinic, 56 Dean Street, works with some of the men involved with chemsex, attempting to find the reasons behind their risk-taking behaviour. In many cases, David believes, the reasons behind slamming parties are complicated and can lie in the sense of isolation and low self-worth that a gay man often experiences in his childhood and teenage years. As one slamming party enthusiast says, “For days you get to feel that you’re worth something.”

Asked about his reasons for screening the film, Jamie told Humanity Hallows, “Chemsex is a very powerful documentary and it’s important that the LGBTQ community are included in discussions about sex.”

Jamie Starboisky introduced the films.

Jamie Starboisky introduced the films.

Regarding the subject of the film, he added, “Chemsex is not just about gay men who want to be promiscuous. It’s deeper than that and, by showing this film, we can help people develop a deeper understanding.”

The event also included a Q&A session chaired by Maurice Nagington from the University of Manchester. The panel was comprised of David Stuart, along with Staff Nurse from Manchester’s REACH clinic Rebecca Evans, Manchester Met Senior Lecturer in Philosophy Dr Phil Hutchinson and Senior Lecturer in Criminology Dr Rob Ralphs. Issues addressed in the session included the importance of education and the risk of making the gay community feel stigmatised.

Audience response to the film was positive, one audience member describing Chemsex as “brave and honest.” There was also general agreement that the reasons behind participation in chemsex parties ran deep, one man commenting that with the recent legalisation of gay marriage, “We should feel happy and we should feel connected and, on paper, we are.”

For more information about upcoming events in the SEX strand, see the Humanities in Public webpage.

Review by Jacqueline Grima. Photography: Rachael Burns

The Reach Clinic is a free and confidential service for people in Manchester who use drugs during sex and need support or advice. Open every Wednesday 3.30pm to 6pm. Walk in or make an appointment. Tel: 0161 276 5204. Email: reach@cmft.nhs.uk

Queer Story Showcase – We Are Family

asian, BAME, bisexual, black, gay, homosexual, lesbian, LGBT, media, muslim, queer, transgender, Uncategorized

Reel In The ClosetQueer Story Showcase will be at the LGBT Foundation on Sunday 28th February 2016 to mark LGBT History Month with a special event themed ‘We Are Family’ celebrating the family we have and the family we choose – our friends. Starting the event with six marvellous short films exploring the afternoon’s theme followed by a screening of documentary Reel In The Closet. In the feature film by Stu Maddox we discover markable footage made by LGBT people of their hidden private lives from the 1930s to the 1980s found lost in archives or rediscovered on old cinefilms found at flea markets.

The event will include a performance by poet, playwright and singer Cheryl Martin, and the director of the film Stu Maddox himself is flying in from San Francisco to answer your questions and maybe help you discover that lost film footage in your closet.

People are invited to join this exciting film afternoon featuring many queer stories, have conversations, relax and during the networking break make connections with filmmakers. February’s theme is ‘We Are Family’ inspired by the 1979 hit disco classic from Sister Sledge as we celebrate the fact that a family can come in many forms.

This Queer Film Network tour is supported by the BFI Film Audience Network via Film Hubs in Wales, South West & West Midlands, North West Central and London.

Doors open at 12.45pm and the event starts at 1pm.

Get tickets: https://queerfamily.eventbrite.co.uk